For Immediate Release         Tuesday September 22, 2009  

 


In the battle to reform the health care system, historically black medical schools have always been on the frontline.

An article in the September issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association points out that for more than a century historically black medical schools have played a pivotal role in providing an avenue of care for those less privileged.

A more recent member of the group, Charles Drew University —recognized by the Federal Department of Education as a Historically Black Graduate Institution and a charter member of the Hispanic Serving Health Professions School—is well positioned to develop medical professionals and researchers trained to address the nation’s health disparities. 

But the “innovative and effective” strategies which could potentially put an end to health disparities and improve health care for all are subject to suffer greatly without the support of long-term financial commitments.

The article—“Historically Black Medical Schools: Addressing the Minority Health Professional Pipeline and the Public Mission of Care for Vulnerable Populations”—was written by Keith C. Norris, MD; Richard S. Baker, MD; Robert Taylor, MD; Valerie Montgomery-Rice, MD; Eve J. Higginbotham, MD: Wayne J. Riley, MD; John Maupin, DDS; Sylvia Drew-Ivie, JD; Joan Y. Reede, MD, MPH; and Gary Gibbons, MD.

Historically Black Medical Schools: Addressing the Minority Health Professional Pipeline and the Public Mission of Care For Vulnerable Populations

 
  For more information, please contact:
John L. Mitchell
Media Advisor at
Charles Drew University of Medicine & Science
Telephone: (323) 563-4981 or cell (323) 681-4225
 
 

CHARLES DREW UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND SCIENCE
1731 East 120th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90059
p 323 563 4987  f 323 563 5987  www.cdrewu.edu

Pioneering in Health and Education