For Immediate Release                                                                                                                                           March 11, 2009


CHARLES DREW UNIVERSITY RESEARCH FINDS STREET GANG ACTIVITY IS A PREDICTOR OF HOMICIDES IN LOS ANGELES NEIGHBORHOODS

Los Angeles, CA — Neighborhoods saddled with gangs fighting over the same turf suffer higher homicide rates and greater instability than areas where the gangs are scarce, according to a recent study by researchers at Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science.

The study—featured online this week in the Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine—examined how the presence of neighborhood street gangs influences homicides rates in communities throughout Los Angeles County.

 “We found the most homicides in neighborhoods where you find the most gangs,” said Paul Robinson, the lead researcher in the study. “In these communities, gang members fight with automatic and semi-automatic weapons, and killings often occur in public places. This is not domestic homicide, or random serial killings. It’s mayhem on the street and it’s an issue of public health.”

The study found that the presence of gangs—with their long term cultural and historic ties in neighborhoods—was a greater predictor of homicides than poverty and unemployment.
Using data from the Los Angeles County Coroners, the research analyzed all 10,880 homicides in Los Angeles County between 1994 and 2002.

Over the eight year period, the study found 3.4 homicides per square mile in neighborhoods without significant gang involvement where more than 4 million people lived. On the other hand, the study found 61.1 homicides per square mile in neighborhoods with 30 or more gangs in a two mile radius. These gang plagued areas were home to about 460,000 persons, but contributed a disproportionate share of homicides.

“Homicides taking place inside homes don’t have the same impact,” he said. “Also, gang killings are more likely to spur retributive violence, leading to concentrated homicide clusters.”

Combating the problem, Robinson said, will require more funding for gang intervention programs, educational support and employment assistance for young men, among other things.

Paul Robinson received his Ph.D. in Urban Geography from the University of Southern California. He has published 15 scholarly papers on the influence of neighborhoods and environments on health related behaviors and outcomes.  Researchers Robinson, Kevin Heslin, Sheba George, W. John Boscardin and Ricky Bluthenthal received support from UCLA/Drew Project Export and/or the Drew MRISP Health Services Grant.

ABOUT CHARLES DREW UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND SCIENCE (CDU)

CDU is a private nonprofit, nonsectarian, minority-serving medical and health sciences institution. Located in the Watts-Willowbrook area of South Los Angeles, CDU has graduated over 550 medical doctors, 2,500 post-graduate physicians, more than 2,000 physician assistants and hundreds of other health professionals.  The only dually designated Historically Black Graduate Institution and Hispanic Serving Health Professions School in the U.S. CDU is recognized as a leader in health inequities and translational research, specifically with respect to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, mental health, and HIV/AIDS. The University is among the top 7% of National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded institutions and rated one of the top 50 private universities in research in the U.S.  Recently, the CDU/UCLA medical program was named the “best performer” in the University of California System with respect to producing outstanding underrepresented minority physicians. For more information, visit http://www.cdrewu.edu.

Here is a link to Paul Robinson’s study 

For more information, please contact:
Paul Robinson
310 761-4731      
323 868 8069 cell
paulrobinson@cdrewu.edu

CHARLES DREW UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND SCIENCE
1731 East 120th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90059
p 323 563 4987 ? f 323 563 5987 ? www.cdrewu.edu

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